Editor in Chief: Moh. Reza Huwaida Wednesday, October 21st, 2020

Afghans Remain Concerned over Delay in Direct Talks

Afghans Remain Concerned over Delay in Direct Talks

KABUL - Afghans remain concerned about the future of the peace process amidst delay in the start of direct negotiations between negotiating teams representing the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban. 
The opening ceremony of the negotiations was held last month but the two sides are yet to agree on procedural rules for the talks. 
“Both the Taliban and the government have their own demands. I don’t think there will be peace if these demands are met,” said Zabihullah Nawabi, an artist in Kabul. 
“The US looks serious in bringing peace to Afghanistan,” said Rohullah Raziqi, a journalist in Kabul.
Analysts said that usually negotiations take time but added that efforts should be made to use the current opportunity for bringing stability to the country.
“In a country where we have seen 40 years of war, achieving peace needs two important measures: creating a definition for peace and understanding of peace. Unfortunately, we do not have any significant achievements regarding this matter,” said Hadi Miran, a political analyst.
“We witnessed wars in Northern Ireland, Congo, Rwanda and other countries. They finally reached to peace through dialogue, but when it comes to Afghanistan, war and peace takes time in the view of the internal aspects of the war,” said Yaser Ahmadzai, head of Afghan Institute of Peace. 
The contact groups of the negotiating teams in Doha have held at least seven meetings to finalize the procedural rules of the talks, but they are yet to agree on two points. 
The Taliban demand recognition of the US-Taliban agreement as the 'mother deal' underlying the Afghan peace negotiations, and Hanafi jurisprudence as the sole religious legal guidelines for the talks. 
Reports say that the republic's team has suggested alternatives to the Taliban’s demands. 
The republic's team has proposed that if a religious issue arises it can be solved based on Hanafi jurisprudence by default, however, the Shia Personal Status Law must be respected, and the choice of religious jurisprudence should be given to other minority groups as well. 
Regarding the US-Taliban agreement, the republic's team recommended four options: 
First option: The terms of the US-Taliban agreement could be accepted as underlying the talks, however, the terms of the joint declaration between the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, NATO and the US should also be accepted as applicable. 
Second option: Neither the US-Taliban agreement nor the declarations of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan with the US and NATO will be recognized as having any authority, and the negotiations will move forward based on the decisions of the consultative Loya Jirga and the Jirga's declarations. 
Third option: Both sides start talks "based on the national interest of Afghanistan." 
Fourth option: The Quran and Hadith are the main authority for the talks, replacing all others. 
The Taliban insist that talking about the Jafari jurisprudence under current circumstances is not logical but said that this can be discussed during the talks about the Constitution of the country. (TOLO NEWS)