Editor in Chief: Moh. Reza Huwaida Friday, November 15th, 2019

Do Taliban Really Want Peace?

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Do Taliban Really Want Peace?

Taliban assured dissociation with international terrorist outfits during the nine rounds of peace talks, which were called off by the U.S. President Donald Trump after the deadly attack in Kabul, killing 12 people including one U.S. soldier. But the assurance has proved false when the head of Al-Qaeda of South Asia branch Asim Umar was killed in a joint U.S.-Afghan raid on Taliban’s compound in the Musa Qala district of Helmand province.
The killing of a notorious militant in Taliban’s compound exhibits that the group hasn’t abandoned ties with the international terrorist organizations yet. Taliban ought to divorce from the band organizations as well as foreign intelligence agencies for making sure their sincere will for peace in Afghanistan and other countries. It was also the principal point of U.S.-Taliban negotiations in Doha, Qatar.
Taliban are persistently reluctant in the cessation of violence against the Afghan citizens and security forces. Ceasefire was the one of the main points of U.S.-Taliban negotiations, but ,During the peace talks, they escalated the violence in order to get leverage on the negotiation table. In the first nine months of 2019, UNAMA documented 8,293 civilian casualties, 62 per cent of which were caused by anti-government mercenaries. Majority of government’s caused civilian casualties occur owing to Taliban’s use of civilians as shield during operations. Taliban’s emphasize on the resumption of peace talks without permanent ceasefire is fallacious.
Taliban’s combat power is shrinking in the battle field day by day because of regular rise in the professionalism of Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) and intensive counter insurgency operations. They have been seeking, in the result of a hurried peace agreement, a break in being continuously hit by joint operations of ANSF and International Security Assistance Forces (ISAF). They want to reorganize their shattered fighter in the result of recent military operations. U.S. and Afghan state should not provide any opportunity to them signing a feeble agreement in haste.
If the Taliban have solemn desire for peace to be prevailed in Afghanistan and are not influenced in their own decisions making, they should announce permanent cease-fire immediately. The chief requisite for resumption of rescinded peace talks is cease-fire, which U.S. and Afghan state and public have been demanding.
Alongside with cease-fire, Taliban should show willingness for intra-Afghan peace dialogues and start direct talks with Afghan state. They do not have any other choice except to abide the prevalent democratic system, which have come in existence after the consensual of all school of thoughts with in the country, except extremists.
Taliban, since their emergence, have hold hostile views towards women rights and education. Contemporarily, Afghan women have enormous participation in political, economical and educational activities. They have 27 per cent participation in Parliament, and 39 per cent out of 9 million students in educational institutions are females. Taliban have to change their radical and adversary views towards women rights for adjusting in the current socio-political system of Afghanistan, and for the resumption of talks.
Ending violence and peace deal are the best options for Taliban, because the miner support for them in the public is diminishing with every passing day, and outrage against their murderous activities is soaring in Afghan society. The Afghans have displayed their dissent, participating in recent presidential election despite the posed deadly threats on Election Day.
If Taliban want to resume peace talks, they should act upon the whims of Afghan masses, and announce permanent cease-fire alongside with consent for intra-Afghan dialogue.

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